Shopping: Club Clio on 14th Street, NYC

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I do try to stay up-to-date with New York’s beauty and fragrance retail news, but it’s a lot to keep track of, and sometimes I don’t know about something until I literally walk right past it on the street.

This Club Clio boutique opened on 14th Street, near Union Square, just last week. I stopped in and took a few photos while I browsed… Continue reading “Shopping: Club Clio on 14th Street, NYC”

Covet: Joya x Snarkitecture Secret Souvenir Candle

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I love New York. I love fancy candles. I can’t help coveting these new products from Joya Studio in collaboration with “art and architecture company Snarkitecture.”

Here’s the official description:

“The offset wick of this otherwise plain cylindrical candle suggests something unexpected beneath the surface. As the candle burns down, a metal souvenir is unearthed and a new and evolving topography of wax is formed. The image of a building in a landscape comes into focus. Each candle in the New York City edition of the Secret Souvenir series contains an Empire State Building, Chrysler Building or Statue of Liberty souvenir at random.” …

Continue reading “Covet: Joya x Snarkitecture Secret Souvenir Candle”

Quick Reads: Frank O’Hara, “A Step Away from Them” (excerpt)

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Frank O’Hara’s poetry collection “Lunch Poems,” first published in 1964, is celebrating its 50-year anniversary.

I own a small used paperback copy of “Lunch Poems” that I bought two years ago. I had heard that O’Hara wrote many of these poems during his lunch breaks while working at the Museum of Modern Art, so I thought I might occasionally read a poem or two during my own museum-job lunch breaks.

Here’s the first stanza of “A Step Away from Them,” written in 1956. It’s a vintage slice of New York in summertime.


It’s my lunch hour, so I go

for a walk amongst the hum-colored

cabs. First, down the sidewalk

where laborers feed their dirty

glistening torsos sandwiches

and Coca-Cola, with yellow helmets

on. They protect them from falling 

bricks, I guess. Then onto the

avenue where skirts are flipping

above heels and blow up over

grates. The sun is hot, but the

cabs stir up the air. I look 

at bargains in wristwatches. There

are cats playing in sawdust.

 

To read the entire poem, click here.

To read a short New York Times article about the anniversary of “Lunch Poems,” click here.

Image: Leonard Freed, Wall Street, 1956.