Sunday Riley Blush in Blushing

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I can’t believe I’ve haven’t already written about Sunday Riley’s powder blush in Blushing. It’s been a staple in my makeup routine for the past two years or more. It’s one of those perfect basics that’s worth the investment, because it’s incredibly versatile and it lasts a very long time.

Here’s an official product photograph. Blushing is a very natural rose shade; I’ve seen it described as “cool,” but I think it’s closer to being a true neutral.

The packaging is Sunday Riley’s usual black-and-gold compact (with a mirror).

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Girls at a Woolworth’s Perfume Counter, 1947

S Kubrick for Look 1947 MNY287533

This photograph was taken in 1947 by Stanley Kubrick, when he was a staff photographer for LOOK magazine in New York. LOOK no longer exists, nor does Woolworth’s. I wonder where these two girls are today, and whether they still wear perfumes, and if so, which ones.

Collections of the Museum of the City of New York, X2011.4.10254.152E

Elsewhere on the Internet: My “Listicle” About Celebrity Perfumes

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For the past two years, I’ve been writing uncredited profiles of famous people in history and culture for the Biography website. Hey, a girl’s got to pay the bills. And more recently, I’ve been authoring articles (really more like “listicles”) on specific topics, with a byline.

Here’s my latest piece, a summary of important moments in celebrity perfumes. Enjoy!

The Art of Perfume Advertising: Princess Isabelle (1980s) and Monet

princesse isabelle 1981 ad

This is such a perfectly summery perfume advertisement that I had to post it. I don’t know anything about Princesse Isabelle, or about this fragrance, other than that it seems to be a romantic floral eau de toilette.

What I do know is that Princesse Isabelle selected a painting by Claude Monet for this ad…

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It’s Monet’s Jeune fille à l’ombrelle tournée vers la gauche (Essai de figure en plein air), dated 1886, now in the collections of the Musée d’Orsay in Paris (see here for more information).

It’s such an apt choice of image. This is just how a perfume should make its wearer feel in the spring or summer: an impression of flickering light, a cool spot of shade, a crisp white dress, with no extraneous detail or narrative to distract from the sheer sensory pleasure of that moment.